Overview

The 2018 Biotechnology Educators Conference will be hosted at Virginia Tech on July 25-27th. Wednesday and Thursday afternoon (July 25th and 26th), we will offer a Biotechnology Boot Camp for educators NEW to the field; spots are first come first serve.

On Thursday the conference will host workshops and talks from scientific experts. Choose your preference of hands-on workshops hosted by scientific experts, first come first served. Thursday night we will have a social and vendor show. Friday, we kick the day off again with a workshop and talks.

The conference will be held on Virginia Tech's Blacksburg campus between the buildings of Fralin Life Science Institute and the Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech. Parking passes will be issued through the conference when you pick up your registration packet.

The fee for the conference is $75 for registrations postmarked/paid by May 1st and $100 for registrations postmarked after May 1st. Registration opens on March 5th at 9 am. Coffee/pastries, box lunches, and heavy hors d’oeuvres served during the social is included in the registration fee.

CEUs will be issued to all participants.

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

Schedule

**Workshops will be added as they are confirmed. On July 1 at noon, we will send an email to registered attendees to choose their workshops. Please make sure that you add Dr. Kristy Collins' email address to your address book to receive the email.**

Wednesday, July 25


1-5pm

Biotech Bootcamp

For educators who are new to teaching biotechnology. Are you intimidated by electrophoresis? Baffled by buffers? Here’s an opportunity to get started in biotech. You will also learn about the Biotech-in-a-Box program, now in its 21st year of lending biotech kits to Virginia educators. Instruction Leader, Kristi DeCourcy, Ph.D. Limited to 20 participants.

Thursday, July 26

7-8am

 

Registration at the Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech
 

8-11:45am

Talks

#1 Biraj M. Patel, M.D. Neurointerventional Surgery, Section Chief, Department of Radiology, Division of Neurosurgery, Assistant Professor, Virgina Tech Carilion School of Medicine, How We Treat Stroke:  A New Era

Objectives:
•Background, patient selection, and imaging in acute stroke
•To understand the past, present, and future of stroke treatment, with emphasis on endovascular therapy
•Endovascular treatment options for acute ischemic stroke

Acute ischemic stroke, a result of clot in a brain blood vessel blocking flow and causing significant neurological deficits, is the fifth leading cause of death in the US.  It is the most common cause of permanent disability.  Until recently, the mainstay treatment for nearly two decades was intravenous (IV) tPA, which is a "clot buster."  However, with improvements in technology and our techniques, endovascular treatment, or minimally invasive technique using devices to treatment stroke from inside the blood vessels, has recently been proven to be the primary treatment in certain patients.  This major shift in how we manage acute ischemic strokes is leading to better outcomes for patients who suffer from this otherwise devastating aliment.
 

#2 Bin Xu, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Tech, Discovery and Understanding of Nutraceuticals for Treating Diabetes and
Neurodegeneration 

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and neurodegeneration (including Alzheimer’s disease) are major
and pressing public health problems that are reaching epidemic proportions. However,
currently attractive therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat these chronic human diseases are lacking. My laboratory focuses on the discoveries of novel nutraceuticals and on understanding how such “medicines from nature and nutrients” work. Several newly discovered examples will be used to illustrate the attractiveness of these low-cost and effective natural bioactive compounds for the prevention and treatment of T2D and neurodegeneration.

#3 Daniel Slade, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Tech, How are bacteria and viruses contributing to human cancers?

Microbes, predominantly viruses and bacteria, account for the initiation and progression of ~20% of human cancers.  Since the discovery nearly 40 years ago that the human gut bacterium Helicobacter pylori induces gastric cancer, we have enhanced our understanding of how bacteria and viruses interact with the human host in adverse ways to induce and enhance a tumor microenvironment.  This talk will cover the mechanisms of how microbes modulate the human host, how the microbiota is being targeted to prevent and treat cancers, and the discovery of an oral bacterium that is prevalent in driving colorectal cancer disease progression. 

11:45 am-1pm


Lunch 

1-3pm

Workshops  (choose one below, first come first served)

#1 Maury Wrightson, HHMI BioInteractive 
Using Nipah Virus to Teach the Many Facets of Epidemiology 

The HHMI BioInteractive resource Virus Hunter: Epidemiology of Nipah Virus includes a variety of methods to engage students in science as a process and the research conducted in the field of epidemiology.  Through videos, readings, data, and hands-on activities students explore the processes of analyzing data with mathematical calculations, making predictions, completing ecological surveys and immunological assays, and formulating solutions to problems.  Participants will engage in the hands-on learning portion of this activity, as well as receive information about how to implement this resource in their classroom.   

#2 Erika Fong, MiniOne 
Go Viral: From One to a Million in Twenty Minutes

Experience how engaging and accessible classroom biotechnology can be with the MiniOne PCR and Electrophoresis Systems. Designed for safely and affordably teaching biotechnology through inquiry-based labs, the MiniOne Systems allow students to have the complete experience of running a molecular biology investigation in one class period. 
    
In this hands-on workshop, you will amplify sections of the Lambda Phage genome using fast and robust PCR. You will program and monitor the MiniOne PCR System using a wireless Bluetooth connection from a tablet app, then watch DNA separation in real time as you analyze your PCR products on the MiniOne Electrophoresis System. We will discuss the design principles that have guided our development of biotech instruments for the classroom, and the wide range of career paths students can explore with a biotech education.

#3 Mayasari Lim, Ph.D., SE3D INC.                               Bioprinting fundamentals: Future Biotech Education

There is no doubt that bioprinting is the future of healthcare and biomanufacturing industry. Fundamental skills and knowledge in bioprinting such as 3D printing, computer aided design (CAD) and biomaterials are becoming essential for training future workforce in the biotechnology and biofabrication industry. This workshop covers the fundamentals in bioprinting technology and provides a framework for educators to create engaging lab activities to support biotech and bioscience education. SE3D provides a UC approved "g" high school curriculum that is NGSS-aligned with applications in biotechnology and green technology.

3:15-5:15pm

Workshops (choose one below, first come first served)

#4 Anne M. Brown, Ph.D., Research & Informatics, University Libraries, Virginia Tech 
Introducing 3-D Visualization Software in Science Classes:  Making Connections and Building Skills in Core Concepts

The structure and dynamics of proteins are an essential part of understanding the molecular foundations of complex biological processes and serve an important role in the field of biology. Biomolecular visualization software can serve as an entryway to begin exploration of, and expose students to, many biological and biochemical relationships and aid in their development in basic science knowledge. In addition, technical skills and effective writing and presentation of scientific material are critical for students and can be embraced in a project-based learning style with biomolecular visualization software. Training and education utilizing biomolecular visualization software and honing writing and presentation skills are often reserved for special studies or higher-level coursework. Presenting more advanced concepts and skills that can connect ideas from introductory level classes in chemistry, biology, and physics earlier in the curriculum is imperative to success in advanced classes and application in research settings for students. This workshop will focus on introducing instructors to biomolecular visualization and present lesson plans and project ideas to implement in the course/curriculum. Instructors will walk away with materials to support students choosing a biomolecule of interest to them to study throughout the semester and use the visualization software, PyMOL (www.pymol.org) to creatively render images to describe protein structure and course topics. Students will be able to discuss the applicability of PyMOL software and the RCSB Protein Data Bank, and discussed how the utilization of these tools will aid them in future endeavors and coursework, given that they now can explore and visualize DNA, RNA, and proteins to understand core concepts    

#5 Maury Wrightson, HHMI BioInteractive
Using Nipah Virus to Teach the Many Facets of Epidemiology 

The HHMI BioInteractive resource Virus Hunter: Epidemiology of Nipah Virus includes a variety of methods to engage students in science as a process and the research conducted in the field of epidemiology.  Through videos, readings, data, and hands-on activities students explore the processes of analyzing data with mathematical calculations, making predictions, completing ecological surveys and immunological assays, and formulating solutions to problems.  Participants will engage in the hands-on learning portion of this activity, as well as receive information about how to implement this resource in their classroom.

#6 Erika Fong, MiniOne 
Go Viral: From One to a Million in Twenty Minutes

Experience how engaging and accessible classroom biotechnology can be with the MiniOne PCR and Electrophoresis Systems. Designed for safely and affordably teaching biotechnology through inquiry-based labs, the MiniOne Systems allow students to have the complete experience of running a molecular biology investigation in one class period. 
    
In this hands-on workshop, you will amplify sections of the Lambda Phage genome using fast and robust PCR. You will program and monitor the MiniOne PCR System using a wireless Bluetooth connection from a tablet app, then watch DNA separation in real time as you analyze your PCR products on the MiniOne Electrophoresis System. We will discuss the design principles that have guided our development of biotech instruments for the classroom, and the wide range of career paths students can explore with a biotech education.

 

 

6-9pm


Social and Vendor Show 
Dinner and 2 drink tickets included in registration

Friday,  July 27

7-8am


Registration at the Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech

8-11:45am


Talks

#4 Jennifer Munson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech-Wake Forest School of Biomedical Engineeringing & Sciences, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Talk Title TBA

#5 Elizabeth Wayne, Ph.D., Post-doctoral Fellow, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Preparing STEM students for an interdisciplinary workforce

Solving the current challenges in today’s world will take a literacy from multiple disciplines. It will also require an integration of soft skills to be able to navigate all of these arenas. I will discuss the challenges of becoming an interdisciplinary scientist, how to translate training in classical disciplines to  solving multidisciplinary, real-life problems.  Incorporated into this talk will be technical summary of the advancements in drug delivery, cancer immunotherapy, and biomedical imaging.

#6 Mayasari Lim, Ph.D., SE3D INC.                               Bioprinting fundamentals: Future Biotech Education

This talk covers the fundamentals in bioprinting technology and provides a framework for educators to create engaging lab activities to support biotech and bioscience education. SE3D provides a UC approved "g" high school curriculum that is NGSS-aligned with applications in biotechnology and green technology.

11:45am-1:00pm


Lunch - Box lunches 

1-4pm

Workshops (choose one below, first come first served)

#7 Sherri Andrews, Bio-Rad Laboratories
Citizen Science Using PCR-GMOs and Invasive Lionfish

Lionfish have greatly impacted biodiversity in coral ecosystems from North Carolina to the Caribbean and beyond.  In this workshop participants will dissect lionfish, extract DNA from fish bits, and will set up PCR reactions to be sent off for sequencing.  The data will be added to the iNaturalist  project database for further analysis.

#8 Mayasari Lim, Ph.D., SE3D INC.                                                                       Bioprinting fundamentals: Future Biotech Education

There is no doubt that bioprinting is the future of healthcare and biomanufacturing industry. Fundamental skills and knowledge in bioprinting such as 3D printing, computer aided design (CAD) and biomaterials are becoming essential for training future workforce in the biotechnology and biofabrication industry. This workshop covers the fundamentals in bioprinting technology and provides a framework for educators to create engaging lab activities to support biotech and bioscience education. SE3D provides a UC approved "g" high school curriculum that is NGSS-aligned with applications in biotechnology and green technology.

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

Housing

2018 Lodging Rates:

We have arranged for a block of rooms to be held at the Hyatt Place Blacksburg. Breakfast is complimentary each morning in their Kitchen Skillet. Single and Double rooms are available for $119.00 each night plus tax. Please use this link to book your room. 

Please note that July is a busy time in Blacksburg and we suggest making your hotel reservations early. State rates are generally not accepeted due to various events on campus.

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

Sponsors

Fralin Life Science Institute

The Fralin Life Science Institute provides resources to Virginia Tech's life sciences community to support innovative research, education, and outreach.
 

Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech

The Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech addresses critical challenges related to the integrative life sciences, especially those posed to human health, habitat and wellbeing. Institutional research programs emphasize information biology, a unifying informatics-driven approach for studying biological systems from molecules and simple organisms to the microbiome and policy considerations in massive human-created networks.

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
 

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